14 Facts You Never Knew About The Spanish Flu

14 Facts You Never Knew About The Spanish Flu

https://www.youtube.com/embed/a6Mud5a4g6E


Torquay Museum invited The Shorely over to experience the Spanish Flu; don't worry we didn't get sick, but we did learn 14 facts we never knew about the - cough, sneeze - virus at the museum’s exhibition More Deadly Than War - Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic.

Entering through the hazard door sign, we're met by a collection of objects - bizarre masks and weird cures - and some mind-blowing stats about the Spanish Flu via Project Curator, Clare Howe, a fountain of knowledge, who explains the Spanish Flu infected 500 million and killed 100 million. To put that in context: the flu killed the equivalent of the UK population one and a half times and would have infected the combined populations of the United States of America, Mexico, and Canada equivalently.

Considering that the Spanish Flu is the biggest killer in human history, why is it that we seem to have displaced its memory? It often gets overshadowed because it occurred around the same time as the First World War; fighting and dying for your country in the trenches has just always attracted more attention than dying of a cough.

14 Facts About Spanish Flu

  1. The Spanish Flu started in 1918

  2. Ended in 1920

  3. It killed 100 million people

  4. And infected 500 million people

  5. It killed more people than both World Wars combined

  6. It’s the worst disaster that humanity has ever seen

  7. The Spanish Flu didn’t come from Spain

  8. The reason it’s called the Spanish Flu is due to wide coverage in the Spanish press

  9. There was no cure for Spanish Flu

  10. They didn’t know how to relieve the symptoms

  11. They put kerosene on sugar cubes for the sick

  12. They also did bloodletting

  13. Oh and the only thing that vaguely helped was Bovril as a warm drink!

  14. People are still investigating flu, because of its potential use for future outbreaks

Nowadays, some of the worlds most known figures are stressing the importance of being prepared for the next flu virus pandemic. Just think of the consequences of the 2014/16 Ebola virus that broke out in West-Africa. The dangers to human civilisation are still present, and Torquay Museum and Wellcome Trust hope that through this exhibition, they can fuel imaginations and spark debate.

“I rate the chance of a widespread epidemic, far worse than Ebola, in my lifetime, as well over 50%.” - Bill Gates, Microsoft Co-Founder | Source: VOX


You can visit Torquay Museum's exhibition, More Deadly Than War - Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic until 24 February 2019. Normal admission fees apply. Head over to their website for more information.

Meet The Maker: Isabella Day, ARTIST Goldsmith

Meet The Maker: Isabella Day, ARTIST Goldsmith

Vasectomies, Vegans & Unruly Nose Hair: This is Torquay Comedy Club

Vasectomies, Vegans & Unruly Nose Hair: This is Torquay Comedy Club